Google Replaces A Site’s URL In Search Results & Uses Its Site Name & Breadcrumb Path

This is no doubt a nod to mobile usability.  Webpages and URLs are deemed non-native to app oriented experiences.  I wouldn’t be surprised if these changes eventually jumped over to desktop in the near future.

Google announced they’ve begun replacing the URL within the search result snippet area with a site name and breadcrumb path. This only impacts the mobile search results but may roll out wider over time.

Google said that starting today they have updated their “algorithms that display URLs in the search results to better reflect the names of websites, using the real-world name of the site instead of the domain name, and the URL structure of the sites in a breadcrumbs-like format.” Google has actually been testing this for a few years now, it was not uncommon for searchers to see these tests over the past few years.

via Google Replaces A Site’s URL In Search Results & Uses Its Site Name & Breadcrumb Path.

NYT on headline write: And what matters more than a story’s “searchable” factor is how “shareable” it is on social media, particularly on Facebook

And what matters more than a story’s “searchable” factor is how “shareable” it is on social media, particularly on Facebook. So headlines need to serve that purpose, too. A headline that works in print when paired with a photograph and placed in the context of a particular section of the paper may be a lot less successful when encountered on Facebook or read on a smartphone. So copy editors are writing different versions of headlines for different platforms, increasing their workload.

via Hey, Google! Check Out This Column on Headlines – NYTimes.com.

Europe v Google: Nothing to stand on | The Economist

The Economist’s point of view on Europe’s regulatory measures against Google (background- Europe files antitrust charges against Google):

…rather than trying to rein in American firms, European politicians should focus on fixing what is holding back the old world’s most promising platforms: the lack of a common digital market. Today only 15% of consumers shop online across borders within the EU. To set up Europe-wide operations, an e-commerce firm has to jump through numerous bureaucratic hoops, from tax rules to labour laws, in each country.

If Europe wants to be America’s equal in the creation of new technological platforms, it needs to recognise the importance of scale. America, with its large and open domestic market, has it. Europe does not.

via Europe v Google: Nothing to stand on | The Economist.

Inside AdWords: Ads Take a Step Towards “HTTPS Everywhere”

By June 30, 2015, the vast majority of mobile, video, and desktop display ads served to the Google Display Network, AdMob and DoubleClick publishers will be encrypted.

Also by June 30, 2015, advertisers using any of our buying platforms, including AdWords and DoubleClick, will be able to serve HTTPS-encrypted display ads to all HTTPS-enabled inventory.

via Inside AdWords: Ads Take a Step Towards “HTTPS Everywhere”.

Rich Greenfield on Twitter: “Netflix shifting marketing dollars OUT of TV with better targeting on mobile – our worries for US TV biz growing http://t.co/Z7pI5CEqqk”

We are increasingly spending on the  promotion of our original content rather than emphasizing attributes of the Netflix brand and service that are now more familiar to consumers.  Early tests in international markets suggest this content focus is aiding member acquisition.

via Rich Greenfield on Twitter: “Netflix shifting marketing dollars OUT of TV with better targeting on mobile – our worries for US TV biz growing http://t.co/Z7pI5CEqqk”.

 

 

FAQ: The New Yahoo-Microsoft Deal, Explained

Good FAQ on the changes.

How Does Ad Selling Change?

Yahoo has been handling ad sales for “premium” buyers — major advertisers and brands — for both Yahoo and Bing. Bing was handling sales for when advertisers would purchase directly, typically self-serve through the Bing Ads platform.

Now things are clearly divided. Yahoo will sell Yahoo ads; Bing will sell Bing ads.

via FAQ: The New Yahoo-Microsoft Deal, Explained.

[Tab dump]: Google purges bad extensions from Chrome

Tens of millions of users who visit Google sites use a browser loaded with malicious add-ons, research suggests.

Most rogue extensions bombard people with ads, but the most malicious steal login names and other valuable data.

Carried out by security experts and Google, the project analysed more than 100 million visits to the search giant’s sites.

It led to Google purging almost 200 bad extensions from its online catalogues of browser add-ons.

via Google purges bad extensions from Chrome – BBC News.

Yahoo renews Microsoft search partnership

There are two major changes.

Yahoo was responsible for the sales relationships for Bing search ads under the partnerships previously. All of those sales relationships are going to come under Microsoft in the coming months.

The new deal now only requires Yahoo to pull a majority of its traffic from the Bing ads marketplace. Just 51%, rather than the 100% it was required to pull before. That means the other 49% of Yahoo’s search traffic could be monetized by Yahoo’s own ad units or by another search provider, like Google.

via Yahoo renews Microsoft search partnership – Business Insider.