New York magazine penalizes advertisers for data-hogging ads 

New York Magazine is getting real with its advertisers, telling them the website can’t guarantee viewability of their ads if they don’t consume less data.“If the advertiser provides creative that does not load in a certain time, then there cannot be viewability conversation,” said Ron Stokes, executive director of client advertising solutions.

Source: New York magazine penalizes advertisers for data-hogging ads – Digiday

New York Times has partnered with startup Chef’d to sell meal kits to readers

Today the New York Times announced it has partnered with startup Chef’d to sell meal kits to readers based on recipes from its NYT Cooking section. Alice Ting, vice president of brand development, licensing and syndication told Bloomberg the Times expects the meal kit service to be at least as big as the Times’ travel unit, where the paper’s foreign correspondents act as tour guides in places like Iran and Cuba.

Source: Are Meal Kits the New Groupon? – Fortune

Criteo Drops 8% on Q2 Earnings Outlook, Joining Rubicon in Ad-Tech Penalty Box  

This is a new one: “Ad tech penalty box”

 

Shares of advertising technology purveyors Criteo (CRTO) are down $3.57, or over 8%, at $39.43, after the company this morning reported Q1 revenue and profit that topped analysts’ expectations, but projected revenue slightly below consensus and affirmed its year outlook for revenue growth.Criteo’s results follow a report yesterday afternoon by competitor Rubicon Project (RUBI) of Q1 results above consensus but a disappointing revenue outlook for this quarter and for the full year. Rubicon shares are down $2.77, or 14%, at $16.92.

Source: Criteo Drops 8% on Q2 Earnings Outlook, Joining Rubicon in Ad-Tech Penalty Box – Tech Trader Daily – Barrons.com

Got a Hot Seller on Amazon? Prepare for the E-Tailer to Make One Too

Rain Design’s experience shows how Amazon is using insights gleaned from its vast Web store to build a private-label juggernaut that now includes more than 3,000 products — from women’s blouses and men’s khakis to fire pits and camera tripods. The strategy is a digital twist on one used for years by department stores and big-box chains to edge out middlemen and go direct to consumers — boosting loyalty and profits.

Source: Got a Hot Seller on Amazon? Prepare for E-Tailer to Make One Too – Bloomberg

How You’re Making Facebook a Money Machine 

For the United States and Canada, Facebook pulled in $11.86 in advertising revenue per user in the first quarter. That’s what advertisers are willing to pay to catch your attention as you argue with your friends and relatives over Donald Trump or coo over baby pictures or both.Facebook’s revenue was up over 50 percent from a year earlier, while its net income soared nearly 200 percent. Its stock leapt on Thursday as the wider market fell. Facebook’s blowout financial performance stood out because Apple, Twitter and Alphabet, Google’s parent company, all reported disappointing first-quarter numbers.

Source: How You’re Making Facebook a Money Machine – The New York Times

The Future of Shopping: Trapping You in a Club You Didn’t Know You Joined

Nice way to create a higher artificial floor on lifetime value:

Regulators, meanwhile, are trying to keep up with potentially misleading subscriptions. The FTC tried to crack down on unfair negative-option practices as far back as 1973, requiring sellers to disclose all terms before customers subscribe. But that rule did not cover automatic renewals. Sixteen states now have statutes addressing the negative-option model. Congress also enacted the Restore Online Shoppers’ Confidence Act in 2010. Federal law prohibits negative-option subscriptions unless the company:

Source: The Future of Shopping: Trapping You in a Club You Didn’t Know You Joined

Yahoo’s $8 Billion Black Hole

Gold star for this anecdote:

Mayer’s position is so weak that when a Bloomberg Businessweek reporter and an editor visited the company’s offices in New York to press the case for an interview, a security guard asked, unprompted, whether Mayer would keep her job. When the question was put back to him, he shook his head, grimaced, and tugged at his collar. “Those hedge fund guys,” he said, “they really don’t like her.”

Source: Yahoo’s $8 Billion Black Hole – Bloomberg Businessweek